To solve our food problems, we must look to the oceans

By Christopher Free and Willow Battista Earlier this spring, 1.5 million livestock died in the Horn of Africa. The immediate culprit was a severe, prolonged drought spurred by the growing effects of climate change. It’s a sign of weakening food systems in a warming world. But while land-based food systems are carbon-intensive and increasingly unstable, […]

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For fisheries in the Caribbean, life revolves around the climate… and our climate resilience

By: Eduardo “Lalo” Boné Morón, Senior Manager, EDF Cuba Oceans Program Juan Carlos Duque, Project Manager of the Biological Corridor in the Caribbean of UNEP José “Pepe” Gerhartz, Conservation Specialist of the CBC Secretariat “Life revolves around the climate,” says José Luis “Pepe” Gerhartz, a senior conservation specialist from the Caribbean Biological Corridor Initiative, or […]

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Supporting climate-resilient fisheries during the UN Decade of Ocean Science

By EDF’s Jacob Eurich and Kristin Kleisner, and Kathy Mills, Gulf of Maine Research Institute Fisheries, including the systems for harvesting, processing and marketing blue foods, are an important pillar of many economies, supporting hundreds of millions of livelihoods. Small-scale fisheries and aquaculture produce more than half of the global fish catch and two-thirds of […]

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The oceans’ twilight zone? More important than you can imagine!

By Douglas Rader, Jamie Collins and Edith Widder, CEO & Senior Scientist, Ocean Research & Conservation Association People of a certain age will recall being mesmerized—perhaps terrified!—by a television series called “The Twilight Zone,” which ran 156 episodes from 1959 to 1964. The show, which focused on people’s experiences at the edge of reality, is […]

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Why are Florida manatees showing up in Cuba and Mexico?

Throughout the winter and spring of 2007, there were several curious sightings of a manatee and her calf in a power plant intake canal in the Cuban town of Santa Cruz del Norte, approximately 33 miles (54 kilometers) east of Havana. Manatees in Cuba aren’t known to frequent power plant canals. That kind of behavior […]

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Blue carbon: A better tomorrow begins below

By: Kristin M. Kleisner and Jamie Collins As we embark this year on the United Nations Ocean Decade, you may be hearing quite a bit about blue carbon. But what is it, and why is it so important for the future of our planet?  Well, the oceans play a critical role in trapping carbon, and they […]

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Blue carbon: A better tomorrow begins below

By: Kristin M. Kleisner and Jamie Collins As we embark this year on the United Nations Ocean Decade, you may be hearing quite a bit about blue carbon. But what is it, and why is it so important for the future of our planet?  Well, the oceans play a critical role in trapping carbon, and they […]

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Spectacular new fish species is first to be named by Maldivian scientist

Out in the azure waters and colorful corals of the Maldives, a resplendent, rainbow-hued fish has become the first to be named and described by a Maldivian researcher. New to science, the rose-veiled fairy wrasse (Cirrhilabrus finifenmaa) is named in the local Dhivehi language. Finifenmaa means “rose” and is a tribute to the islands’ pink-hued […]

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